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Native
na•tiv /náytiv/
Native means born or produced in a specific region or country, but it can also apply to persons or things that were introduced from elsewhere some time ago...
Excerpt from The Pocket Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus
By Elizabeth Jewell



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Thursday
Jul082010

Roasted Red Pepper Bruschetta 


At about 6:00 pm these little treats, along with various other finger foods, are being consumed in bars throughout Tuscany for aperitivo.

2 red peppers, completely dry
olive oil
sea salt
tuscan bread, sliced and cut into hand-held size pieces
thinly sliced proscuitto or pecorino cheese (optional)

Peppers can be roasted on a gas stove top or in the oven. Both methods are relatively easy.

Gas stove top method: Turn 2 burners on to medium, using long tongs place peppers on flames. Rotate peppers until the whole of them are completely black. Place in a paper or plastic bag loosely sealed for 10 minutes. Remove from bag and with a paper towel rub off the black skins. Do not rinse.

Oven method: Place oven rack near top. Turn broiler on high. Place pepper on a foil or parchment covered cookie sheet and place in oven. Rotate peppers until the whole of them are completely black. Place in a paper or plastic bag loosely sealed for 10 minutes. Remove from bag and with a paper towel rub off the black skins. Do not rinse.

Slice into long, spaghetti-like pieces. Baste the bread with olive oil then toast them in the oven until crisp. Sprinkle with salt. Top with proscuitto or cheese if desired and the peppers. 

Printable .pdf available here

 

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