Welcome. Native Food & Wine was created for those who want to better understand where what they eat and drink comes from. We travel the world to research and record the many cultural and historical aspects that contribute to the pleasures we experience at the table. We hope you’ll join us in an exploration of the origins of food and wine. Read more about us > [here]


Native
na•tiv /náytiv/
Native means born or produced in a specific region or country, but it can also apply to persons or things that were introduced from elsewhere some time ago...
Excerpt from The Pocket Oxford Dictionary and Thesaurus
By Elizabeth Jewell



RSS

Facebook

Twitter

You Tube

Tags
Search This Site

Monday
Mar292010

Gremolata

 

Gremolata is a combination of parsley, garlic, and lemon which gives immense flavor to all sorts of dishes. It is a cousin to persillade (France) and chimichurri (Argentina). Gremolata’s herbal, fresh flavor goes well with soups, grilled meats, potatoes and salads and is a staple in Italian and Greek cuisines.

If added at the end of cooking, or to cold dishes, it is quite strong due to the raw garlic. Adding a few minutes before the end of cooking in hot dishes like soups mellows the garlic a touch. Cayenne pepper is sometimes added for an extra kick. Mixed with breadcrumbs, gremolata makes an excellent crust for roasting lamb or beef.

2 cloves garlic, minced very finely or put through a press
2 cups flat leaf (Italian) parsley, packed, leaves only, chopped very finely
zest of 2 lemons
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Combine all ingredients and use within one day. Holds for two days but it is best fresh.


Printable version (.pdf)

Reader Comments (2)

Gremolata is always a favorite around here on almost anything. I especially like it on grilled fish!
Monday, 29 March 2010 | Unregistered CommenterDebi (Table Talk)
I like the use of this in braised food, long cooks seems to need something to bring life back to the dish.. i.e. Osso Bucco
Thursday, 1 April 2010 | Unregistered CommenterPaul Bacino
Comments for this entry have been disabled. Additional comments may not be added to this entry at this time.
« Roasted Red Pepper Bruschetta | Main | Hummus »